Full Bio

My Acting Journey

In Third Person

Sam, as he writes this.

Sam, as he writes this.

Sam, a little unsure of what he is doing.

Sam, a little unsure of what he is doing.

Sam, feeling a little better about this whole thing.

Sam, feeling a little better about this whole thing.

Sam, maybe in your backyard.

Sam, maybe in your backyard.

Sam graduated from NYU Tisch with a BFA in Acting in December of 2016. Nightly, he wakes with a fright - sweating, penetrated by the sobering thought of trying to understand how he got here and what he is doing, all the while thinking in the third person. This page is his attempt to rationalize his life choices.

Manhattan, 2013: As he walked up to his new dorm on the iconic 5th Avenue, Sam realized he had no idea what he was getting into. He didn't know how to act. He thought about getting in the trunk of his mom's car, then he wouldn't have to deal with the shame of explaining to her why he would abandon his dreams until he got home and could lock himself in his room. He stayed, though, because he was too embarrassed to embarrass himself like that. He soon discovered that he would do just fine there.

During college, Sam developed a love for theater dealing with characters who are at passionate and strained odds with where they fit in the world, getting the opportunity to work on such iconic characters as Shakespeare's Romeo, Odets' Joe Bonaparte, and Chekhov's Trigorin. He got lost in the worlds of Martin McDonagh, Will Eno, Annie Baker, and Harold Pinter. Along the way, he found a great interest in acting for film and television, discovering and devouring the interchange and subtle differences between telling a story to a theater audience and telling a story through the frame of a camera. He aims to continue to explore the limitless potentialities that great theater and filmmakers have created in their mediums - all while attempting to make his own worlds.

The Beginning: Sam got his start on the stage in elementary school, regretfully performing in mandatory school-wide dramatic and musical productions, originating iconic and powerhouse characters like Tree #3. One fateful Tuesday morning in the fourth grade, following a rigorous audition process that took place in the middle of music class, surrounded by competition like the great Ben Herndon and Will Duncan, masters of the craft, the true actor that had been hiding in Sam was born. On that fateful day, he gets cast as Bobo the Clown in the upcoming production of Under the Big Top - an original play perhaps written by a faculty member? The seeds of his love had been planted, so to speak.

Several obscure middle school productions later, Sam transfers to a newer and larger high school, and boy is he afraid to put himself out there. He hides his passions behind a mask of skateboards. He meets a girl. He falls in love. She thinks they're just friends. He scoffs in private. They become closer. She says, "Take a theater class with me." He remembers it as a seductive whisper. He quickly shoots back, "Theater's for nerds," pausing before muttering with a blush, "But OK." Because even though he wants to act, he desperately wants to be cool. Is it possible, or just a pipe dream? Either way, he has to be with her. It is true love. Through the semester-long course, he realizes not only does he love her, but he also loves to "tread the boards." That's actor lingo for acting. He decides to audition for school plays until the end of high school - for then he could spend the rest of his days with his two true loves.

Much to his surprise, the first five characters he plays are all well above the age of 90 - he ponders the idea of an acting career, but tactfully thinks to himself, "When I get into the real world will I even work? Not with a resume like this! I can't toss away my youth treading the boards on a mobility scooter - even if it has 4 wheel drive." Besides, by this time he had come to realize the arrow Cupid shot in his back was ill-timed - he wasn't truly in love. This ain't no fairy tail, and if the fire of one of his loves could die, so too could the other. He carries on, weighted by emotive forces he didn't understand.

It's now 11th grade. Time flies. Over the previous few years of trudging through the high school theater world, a shift that can only be described as tectonic has occurred in the inner-workings of Sam's belly; he decides he won't be the professional skateboarder or even the architect he had always dreamt of becoming, but that he must be an actor; something about the passionate creativity and atmosphere involved in a truly giving theater hit him smack-dab in the feels. 

After years of hoping someone would see him as the 17 year old he knew he was, he is cast as the devilish Mortimer Brewster in Arsenic and Old Lace. "Not quite 17, but close enough!" he proudly exclaims to himself, loud enough to draw the gaze of several people minding their own business.

He finally has reason to believe in his dreams. So, during college application season, he applies strictly to acting schools, hoping that some admissions dumbo at some flapjack of a school would fall for his devious acting tricks. He just didn't think that dumbo would be a New Yorker.